Urban ItGirl!

kaylahraquel:

prettylxxxve:

pokerwithplato:

theuppitynegras:

queeniman:

dirtycartunes:

the-real-goddamazon:

thepoeticrebel:

chacha-again:

sizvideos:

Who needs traffic lights? Not the drivers in Ethiopia - Video

This made me so uncomfortable.

Christ…

Oh look it’s Abuja in a nutshell.

aside from very few intersections this how it works in haiti. most of the roads ain’t paved either (though they’ve been working on that consistently)

how do people cross the street without dying

I’d just wouldn’t cross the street I’d have to plan out my entire life on  one side of the street

Same thing happened in Ghana if have anxiety attacks in the car because I couldn’t understand how they were able to do this. It’s scary as hell’n

This is art. Talent. Wth.

It’s like this in Dominican Republic as well.

Frogger in real life…kaylahraquel:

prettylxxxve:

pokerwithplato:

theuppitynegras:

queeniman:

dirtycartunes:

the-real-goddamazon:

thepoeticrebel:

chacha-again:

sizvideos:

Who needs traffic lights? Not the drivers in Ethiopia - Video

This made me so uncomfortable.

Christ…

Oh look it’s Abuja in a nutshell.

aside from very few intersections this how it works in haiti. most of the roads ain’t paved either (though they’ve been working on that consistently)

how do people cross the street without dying

I’d just wouldn’t cross the street I’d have to plan out my entire life on  one side of the street

Same thing happened in Ghana if have anxiety attacks in the car because I couldn’t understand how they were able to do this. It’s scary as hell’n

This is art. Talent. Wth.

It’s like this in Dominican Republic as well.

Frogger in real life…kaylahraquel:

prettylxxxve:

pokerwithplato:

theuppitynegras:

queeniman:

dirtycartunes:

the-real-goddamazon:

thepoeticrebel:

chacha-again:

sizvideos:

Who needs traffic lights? Not the drivers in Ethiopia - Video

This made me so uncomfortable.

Christ…

Oh look it’s Abuja in a nutshell.

aside from very few intersections this how it works in haiti. most of the roads ain’t paved either (though they’ve been working on that consistently)

how do people cross the street without dying

I’d just wouldn’t cross the street I’d have to plan out my entire life on  one side of the street

Same thing happened in Ghana if have anxiety attacks in the car because I couldn’t understand how they were able to do this. It’s scary as hell’n

This is art. Talent. Wth.

It’s like this in Dominican Republic as well.

Frogger in real life…kaylahraquel:

prettylxxxve:

pokerwithplato:

theuppitynegras:

queeniman:

dirtycartunes:

the-real-goddamazon:

thepoeticrebel:

chacha-again:

sizvideos:

Who needs traffic lights? Not the drivers in Ethiopia - Video

This made me so uncomfortable.

Christ…

Oh look it’s Abuja in a nutshell.

aside from very few intersections this how it works in haiti. most of the roads ain’t paved either (though they’ve been working on that consistently)

how do people cross the street without dying

I’d just wouldn’t cross the street I’d have to plan out my entire life on  one side of the street

Same thing happened in Ghana if have anxiety attacks in the car because I couldn’t understand how they were able to do this. It’s scary as hell’n

This is art. Talent. Wth.

It’s like this in Dominican Republic as well.

Frogger in real life…

kaylahraquel:

prettylxxxve:

pokerwithplato:

theuppitynegras:

queeniman:

dirtycartunes:

the-real-goddamazon:

thepoeticrebel:

chacha-again:

sizvideos:

Who needs traffic lights? Not the drivers in Ethiopia - Video

This made me so uncomfortable.

Christ…

Oh look it’s Abuja in a nutshell.

aside from very few intersections this how it works in haiti. most of the roads ain’t paved either (though they’ve been working on that consistently)

how do people cross the street without dying

I’d just wouldn’t cross the street I’d have to plan out my entire life on one side of the street

Same thing happened in Ghana if have anxiety attacks in the car because I couldn’t understand how they were able to do this. It’s scary as hell’n

This is art. Talent. Wth.

It’s like this in Dominican Republic as well.

Frogger in real life…


yaddy123:


hyyy-errr:

rxdicvl:

dichotomization:

On June 11th 1963, Thích Quảng Đức, a Vietnamese Buddhist monk, sat down in the middle of a busy intersection in Saigon, covered himself in gasoline and he then ignited a match, and set himself on fire. Đức burned to death in a matter of minutes, and he was immortalized in a famous photograph taken by a reporter who was in Vietnam in order to photograph the war. All those who saw this spectacle were taken by the fact that Duc did not make a sound while burning to death. Đức was protesting President Ngô Đình Diệm’s administration for oppressing the Buddhist religion.

holy shit. 

I was waiting for this to come up on my dash. You also can’t forget that his whole body burned, but his heart remained intact and did not burn.

This dude.


Wow…

yaddy123:

hyyy-errr:

rxdicvl:

dichotomization:

On June 11th 1963, Thích Quảng Đức, a Vietnamese Buddhist monk, sat down in the middle of a busy intersection in Saigon, covered himself in gasoline and he then ignited a match, and set himself on fire. Đức burned to death in a matter of minutes, and he was immortalized in a famous photograph taken by a reporter who was in Vietnam in order to photograph the war. All those who saw this spectacle were taken by the fact that Duc did not make a sound while burning to death. Đức was protesting President Ngô Đình Diệm’s administration for oppressing the Buddhist religion.

holy shit. 

I was waiting for this to come up on my dash. You also can’t forget that his whole body burned, but his heart remained intact and did not burn.

This dude.

Wow…


vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reservedvmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reservedvmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reservedvmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reservedvmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reservedvmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reservedvmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reservedvmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reservedvmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reservedvmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer
Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / 2 / 3
As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]
©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved

vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer

Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / / 3

As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]

©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved